The Monster Match App released! (using FDT and Starling for iOS)

Hello You All,

We just released The Monster Match an iOS app built with AIR and Starling that will let You Mix, Match and discover the monstrous, the eerie, the wacky and funny combinations of characters that renowned artists created exclusively for The Monster Match, once you created a Monster of your liking you can save it to your camera roll or share with your friends via E-Mail, Twitter or Facebook.

mmiP5_ss_01

We choose Flash as the development platform because is a tool that we know well and also knew it will let us take the concept and design faster and accurately to a working application.

The whole app was coded in FDT IDE  and some of the animations where prototyped on Flash C6 , we use the  Starling framework  by GAMUA as the base of our code and found out it has a lot of improvements since the last time we’ve used, the Assets Manager was a time saver, and we also used some of the new device detection features (Originally the app was going to be a released both for iPhone and iPad but we had to push the release for the iPad version to a later time) . The core of the app’s functionality was done using Feathers UI by Josh Tynjala and the sharing features were done using the GoViral ANE extension by MilkMan Games.

mmiP5_ss_02

We are very happy with the end result and hope to be releasing the iPad version of the app pretty soon.

mmiP5_ss_04

Enjoy this new free app from Team-O mixing, matching and sharing monstrous characters and remember …. not to play alone in the dark!

Links:

The Monster Match Official Website

http://wrto.co/mash

The Monster Match Support Website
http://wrto.co/mashsupport

The Monster Match Press Kit zip file (In case You want to share the love ).

http://wrto.co/mashpresskit

App Store
http://wrto.co/mashappstore

Vimeo
http://wrto.co/mashvideo

Facebook
http://wrto.co/mashfb

 

Thanks for reading and happy  coding!

Dave

Adobe Scout and how to use ANT to enable Advanced Telemetry in FDT

Hello there,

So as you might have heard by now adobe just launched the Game Developer Tools in their Creative Cloud including the Adobe Gaming SDK 1.0 which includes the latest Adobe Flash platforms tools to get started creating cross-platform desktop and mobile games.

The SDK contains the following:

  • The AIR SDK 3.5 for compiling and packaging your mobile (AIR) and web (Flash Player) based games.
  • Native Extensions (ANE) Beta including extensions for iOS Game center, Product Store, SOcial, StageAD, BetaTesting.
  • Starling The 2D (Stage3D) open-source framework.
  • Feathers The 2D (Stage3D) open-source UI component framework.
  • Away3D The 3D open-source framework to power your 3D games.
  • ATF Tools Command-line utilities for the creation of ATF ( compressed textures) for Stage3D
  • Samples 3 Flash Builder 4.7 example Projects that use a combination of the tools included in the SDK.

Alongside the release of this SDK Adobe also released the first public beta of Adobe Scout (previously codenamed Monocle) the next-generation advanced profiling tool for Flash Player and AIR.

Quoting Adobe:

“Adobe Scout will revolutionize the way developers profile and optimize ActionScript based content. For the first time, developers have access to very granular information about CPU and GPU rendering, network or ActionScript stack.”

Which lead us to the second part of this post

Using ANT to enable Advanced Telemetry in FDT

So if you follow me on twitter or are a frequent reader of this blog you must know by  now that my weapon of choice for Flash Platform projects is FDT  so i wanted  to try the advanced features of Adobe Scout in my FDT projects, in order to use those advanced features Scout relies on the telemetry feature that was introduced in Flash Player 11.4 and Adobe AIR 3.4. This feature gathers detailed information about the internals of the Flash runtime, as well as the ActionScript code that it executes, and sends it all to Scout. To access all the data that is available, such as information on your ActionScript code and detailed information about DisplayList rendering and Stage3D, you need to enable advanced telemetry on your SWF.

If You’re a Flash Builder 4.7 user the enable advanced telemetry is built in so all you need to do is to click a checkbox in order to enable it. The FDT is currently working to implement an advanced telemetry option in the FDT IDE. But being the obsessive folk that i am i wanted to try those features “RIGHT NOW!” so i build a little ANT task file that enables advanced telemetry in your SWF by using a Python script (add-opt-in.py).

Heres how to use it:

To use this ANT task You need to have the following components:

1.- At least Adobe Flex 4.6 SDK with AIR 3.4 or the Flash Player 11.4.
Adobe Scout desktop application. You can find the Adobe Scout and the latest AIR SDK at:
http://gaming.adobe.com/

2.- In order to run the add-opt-in.py script  you’ll need to have python installed (I’m using Python 2.7.3 Mac OS X 64-bit/32-bit x86-64/i386)

Download Python at:
http://www.python.org/download/

3.- You can download or fork the add-opt-in.py script (it’s already included in this project in the scripts folder)  from:
https://github.com/adamcath/telemetry-utils

4.- Learn more about Adobe Scout reading the “Getting started with Adobe Scout” article by Thibault Imbert:
http://www.adobe.com/devnet/flashruntimes/articles/adobe-scout-getting-started.html

Here’s the ANT task project:

The Ant project has instructions and comments on how to use each of the tasks.

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<!--?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?-->
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project name="Advanced Telemetry" default="03. Run Application">
	<!--/////////////////////// Project Properies //////////////////////-->
	<!-- Your Project's name -->
	<property name="project_name" value="AdvancedTelemetryAntExample"/>
	<!-- Your Project's source folder. -->
	<property name="src_dir" value="${basedir}/../../src/classes"/>
	<!-- Your Project's deploy folder. -->
	<property name="deploy.dir" value="${basedir}/../../bin"/>
	<!-- Your Project's script folder (where your Python Script is). -->
	<property name="scripts_dir" value="${basedir}/scripts"/>
	<!-- Path to the 'Main' or 'Document' class for your .SWF file.-->
	<property name="main_class" value= "${src_dir}/com/swfgeek/test/AdvancedTelemetryAntExample.as"/>
	<!-- Flag whether to compile the SWF for debugging.-->
	<property name="debug_enabled" value="false"/>
	<!-- The name of your swf file.-->
	<property name="swf_name" value="${deploy.dir}/AdvancedTelemetryAntExample"/>
	<!-- The launcher you'll be using once your SWF is compiled.
	The below values are applicable when using the swflauncher argument:
		External SWF Viewer
		Adobe Flash Player
		Browser
		Internal SWF Viewer
		AIR Debug Launcher -->
	<property name="launcher" value="Adobe Flash Player"/>
 
	<!-- The "Build SWF File" task will compile your SWF and add it to your deploy directory.-->
	<target name="01.Build SWF File">
		<fdt.launch.application 
			projectname="${project_name}" 
			mainclass="${main_class}" 
			debug="${debug_enabled}"  
    		target="${swf_name}.swf" 
    		startswf="false" 
    		swflauncher="${launcher}"/>
	</target>
 
	<!-- The "Add Advanced Telemetry" task will execute the add-opt-in.py thon script on  your SWF and add the  EnableTelemetry tag to for use with Adobe Scout (You can also run this task if you've already compiled the SWF).
	When adding [password] just after the ${swf_name}.swf advanced telemetry will only be visible
	if a matching password is entered in Adobe Scout. -->
	<target name="02. Add Advanced Telemetry"  depends="01.Build SWF File">
		<exec dir="${scripts_dir}" executable="python" failonerror="true">
		    <arg line="add-opt-in.py ${swf_name}.swf" />
		</exec>
	</target>
 
	<!-- The "Run Application" task is the default in your ANT project and will compile, add telemetry and run your SWF. Once your SWF is running you'll be able to see the Advanced Telemetry options in Adobe Scout.-->
	<target name="03. Run Application" depends="02. Add Advanced Telemetry">
		<fdt.loadProjectProperties/>
		<fdt.startSwf projectname="${project_name}" swflocation="${swf_name}.swf" swflauncher="${launcher}" />
	</target>
</project>

Examples

Here are the examples with advanced telemetry enabled, you can open both this SWFs in your browser and if you have Adobe Scout opened you’ll see the the advanced telemetry information the file outputs to Scout.

Starling Example (with a cool animated character stolen from Chris Georgenes).
Flash Display Example (just random color circles)

Here is the zipped project including the AdvancedTelemetryANT Project and the source code for compiling both examples:

Advanced Telemetry ANT Example Project

Combined version of the Flex 4.6 and AIR 3.5 SDK for the lazy ones.

Hello You all,

I’m sure about this time you’ve already heard that  Adobe’s  AIR 3.5 SDK and Flash Player 11.5 are out of beta and ready to download for production work, if You have been staying up to date You know that in order to use the new features of AIR and the Flash Player runtimes you have to merge it with the Flex SDK and then add/remplace the playerglobal.swc file and unless you have a tool like FDT IDE that makes this process less cumbersome by doing the merge for you with a single click, but when you’re not using FDT you need to go and use the terminal of some other tool for merging.

So in order to save You the effort I’m uploading a combined version of the Flex 4.6 and AIR 3.5 SDK so all you have to do is download the zip file uncompress add it to your IDE of choice SDK’s path and start playing with AIR 3.5 and Flash Player 11.5.

 

Download the Combined version of the Flex 4.6 and AIR 3.5 SDK

 

Cheers,
Dave

 

 

Starling Tips and Tricks Talk

Hello You all,

I’m pretty glad to announce that I will be giving a Starling talk for the Hawaii Flash User Group the  meeting will be on-line through Connect  the next 22 of November at  05:00 PM – 06:00 PM (GMT-5 Eastern Time US & Canada).

Here’s the description of what we’ll be seeing:

Starling Tips & Tricks

Starling is a free Open Source Game Engine built on top of Adobe’s Flash technology developed by Gamua the creators of the Sparrow Game Framework for iOS, it runs not only in the browser, but on all major mobile platforms out there, including iOS and Android.

 

I’ve been using Starling in my last projects and learned a few tips & tricks that I want to share with You in the course of this meeting.

 

Although Starling can be used for Desktop & Browser projects I’ll be focusing on Starling for Mobile more specifically for the iOS platform, I will show You how to develop a simple game that runs on iPhone/iPad both in SD and HD resolutions using a single code base.

 

Things we’ll see on the meeting:

 

  • How to set up your Starling project in FDT IDE.
  • Create and prepare your Textures using Texture Packer.
  • Set up your main class file so your game runs both on iPhone/iPad SD and Retina displays.
  • Set up your Assets class so it grabs the proper texture based on the device your game is running.
  • Create and implement Bitmap Fonts for your game texts using Glyph Designer
  • Test Debug and Profile your application both on the simulator and on physical devices.
  • Set up and export your final iOS application.

Thanks for reading and hope to see You there!

More info at:

Hawaii Flash Adobe User Group:

http://hawaiiflash.groups.adobe.com/index.cfm?event=post.display&postid=44865

RSVP at Meetup:

http://www.meetup.com/hawaiiflash/events/89770102/

Facebook Event:

http://www.facebook.com/events/402762659797607/

 

Targeting Flash Player 11 & AIR 3 Release Candidates in Flash Professional CS5.5

This post was written before Adobe made the announcement that the Flash Player 11 and AIR 3.0 runtime will be available next month.

Although all of my projects are coded in FDT4 I still use Flash Professional on a regular basis that because a great part of those projects have complex timeline animations usually made by the animation artist working in the project so my workflow usually involves the Flash IDE for exporting the final swf, here is a guide on how to set up Your copy of Adobe Flash Professional CS5.5 to target the Flash Player 11 and AIR 3.0 Release Candidates, let’s get started:

Targeting Adobe Flash Player 11 Release Candidate for Desktops.

1.- Download the Flash Player 11 Release Candidate.
First things first go to the Adobe Labs site and download the Adobe Flash Player 11 Release Candidate for Desktops. Download the proper player for Your system ( Is important that You download and install the runtime on Your browser otherwise you won’t be able to test your SWFs as there is no Standalone RC1 version). You need to download the Flash Player 11 Release Candidate Global SWC “playerglobal.swc” as well.

2.- Once You installed Flash Player in the browser and renamed the swc file from flashplayer11_rc1_playerglobal_090611 to “playerglobal.swc” go to “/Applications/Adobe Flash CS5.5/Common/Configuration/ActionScript 3.0” and create a new folder i named mine FP11_RC1 and copy your playerglobal.swc file inside the folder you just created.

 

3.- Now You need a new player profile so You can choose the Flash Player 11 RC1 from the available player versions when working with Flash, go to ” /Applications/Adobe Flash CS5.5/Common/Configuration/Players/”  duplicate the FlashPlayer10_2 2.xml and give it a new name to the file You just copy I named mine FlashPlayer11_RC1.xml.

4.- Open that file in a text editor and change the id and version in the player tag for id give it the name You wish to be displayed in the Player panel inside of Flash I named mine “FlashPlayer11_RC1” and change the version to “13”.


   Flash Player 11_RC1

5.- In the same file change the path tag so it points to the folder You just created:

   

6.- Save the file open Flash CS5.5 and You’re good to go.

 

*Note* Remember that there’s no Standalone for Flash Player 11 RC1 so when You test your project in Flash ht command + F12 in order to publish to browser (Where You should have the Flash Player 11 RC1 plugin installed by now.

Targeting Adobe AIR 3 Release Candidate.

1.- Download the AIR 3.0 Release Candidate.
First thing You need is the Adobe AIR 3 SDK Release Candidate.

2.- Unzip Your AIR SDK if You’re on Mac the file will be named ” air3_rc1_sdk_mac_090611.tbz2″

3.- Close Flash Professional CS5.5 and browse o the AIR 2.6 folder, on Mac it will be in the following location
“/Applications/Adobe Flash CS5.5”

4.- Change the AIR2.6 folder name to something like AIR2.6_old.

5.- Rename the folder You previously unzipped to AIR2.6 and place it on the Flash Professional CS5.5 folder “/Applications/Adobe Flash CS5.5”.

6.- Browse to the AIR2.6/frameworks/libs/air/ folder and copy the airglobal.swc.

 

 

7.- Paste the SWC file in the folder “/Applications/Adobe Flash CS5.5/Common/Configuration/ActionScript 3.0/AIR2.6” it wil replace your copy of  the airglobal.swf file.

8.- Browse to the “/Applications/Adobe Flash CS5.5/Common/Configuration/Players” folder and open the following files with a text editor:  AdobeAIR2_6.xml, AiriPhone.xml, or Android.xml.

 

9.- Change the version attribute in the player tag from 11 to 13 and save the files:

On the Android xml file:

On the AiriPhone xml file:

On the AdobeAIR2_6 xml file:

10.- Browse to the “/Applications/Adobe Flash CS5.5/AIR2.6/samples/” and open the descriptor-sample.xml file.

11.- Change the “http://ns.adobe.com/air/application/2.6” namespace URL to “http://ns.adobe.com/air/application/3.0”.

12.- Save the file and open Flash.

Testing time:

In order to see that You’re targeting the RC1 versions of the Flash PLayer 11 and AIR 3.0 here are 2 quick tests:

To test Flash Player 11:
1.- Open the Flash IDE go to File > New > ActionScript 3.0 to create a new flash document in the Player section of the Properties panel select the “Flash Player 11_RC1” as your player version.

2.- With the first frame selected go to Window > Actions to open the ActionScript panel and write the following.

import flash.display.Stage3D;

var stage3d = new Stage3D();   

var my_fmt:TextFormat = new TextFormat();
my_fmt.color = 0xFF0000;
my_fmt.size = 32;
my_fmt.bold = true;
my_fmt.font  = "Arial";
	
var textF: TextField = new TextField;
textF.defaultTextFormat = my_fmt;
textF.autoSize = TextFieldAutoSize.LEFT;
textF.text = "Hello Flash Player: " + Capabilities.version + "\n" + stage3d;
	
addChild(textF);

Here we are importing one of the classes only available to FP11 “Stage3D” and creating a text field to display the version of Flash Player installed in our browser.

3.- Hit Command + F12 to publish to browser if we did everything ok You should see your swf displaying the player version and the Stage3D object.

To test AIR 3.0:

1.- Open the Flash IDE go to File > New > AIR to create a new flash for AIR document in the Player section of the Properties panel select the “AIR 2.6” as your player version.

2.- With the first frame selected go to Window > Actions to open the ActionScript panel and write the following.

import flash.display.Stage3D;
import flash.desktop.NativeApplication;
import flash.text.TextField;

function air3_test(){
	var stage3d = new Stage3D();
	var my_fmt:TextFormat = new TextFormat();
	my_fmt.color = 0xFF0000;
	my_fmt.size = 32;
	my_fmt.bold = true;
	my_fmt.font  = "Arial";
	var textF: TextField = new TextField;
	textF.defaultTextFormat = my_fmt;
	textF.autoSize = TextFieldAutoSize.LEFT;
	textF.text = "Hello AIR Version No. " + NativeApplication.nativeApplication.runtimeVersion +"\n" + stage3d;
	addChild(textF);
	trace ( "+ Flash CS5.5.air3_test() - args: " + [stage3d,"AIR Version: " + NativeApplication.nativeApplication.runtimeVersion ] );
}

air3_test();

Here we are importing one of the classes only available to FP11 “Stage3D” and creating a text field to display the version of Flash Player using the “NativeApplication” class.

3.- Go to Debug > Debug Movie > in AIR Debug Launcher(Desktop) to publish our file if we did everything ok You should see your swf displaying the AIR version and the Stage3D object.

And that’s it, thanks for reading and Happy Flashing.

Book Review: ActionScript Developer’s Guide to Robotlegs

So quite some time after I got this book on my hands I’ve finally taken the time to sit down and read it and let me open this post saying that I really enjoyed it. ActionScript Developer’s Guide to Robotlegs will guide You through the inner workings of the Robotlegs framework in a very straightforward and concise way, the authors Lindsey Fallow (Stray) and Joel Hooks (who also are part of the Robotlegs core team) do so by taking real-life applications and break them apart showing You how Robotlegs gets things done in the process, each chapter is full of tips equally appealing to Robotlegs newcomers and seasoned users of the framework. The book is written in such a way that has a very “Head First Series” nice feel to it taking You from the basics to more advanced features, troubleshooting, tips, good practices and power-ups in a very clear way.

What I liked the most about this book is the fact that Is really well explained, from the table of contents to the appendixes is a step by step companion as You dive deeper in the core concepts of Robotlegs such as Context, Commands, MediatorMaps and DI ( Be sure to check the Appendix B dedicated entirely on how Robotlegs handles dependency injection).

When You’re entirely new to a framework such as Robotlegs You might find yourself lost in nomenclatures and concepts previously unknown to you, well this book untangles it all for You and gently clears your way as you read along and event when you’ve used Robotlegs before is full of juicy tips and best practices that will surely help you have a better understanding on how you wire your applications using the framework.

You can get the book in digital or print format at O’Reilly in case you haven’t already done so, I definitely recommend it for anyone thinking on using the Robotlegs Framework or anyone who is already using it on a regular basis.

I like to thank Stray and Joel for taking the time to write this book and the Robotlegs team for the efforts on the framework (keep up the wonderful work guys).

Don’t forget to visit Robotlegs.org for the latest on the framework.

Happy Reading.

Flash Player 11 & AIR 3 Betas at Adobe Labs

Adobe in his secret plan of not letting Me catch up with the latests runtimes 😉 has just released new beta versions of Adobe Flash Player 11 and Adobe AIR 3 and are available at Adobe Labs.

Some of the new features are:

Adobe® Flash® Player 11 desktop beta drives innovation for rich, engaging digital experiences with new features for cross-platform browser-based viewing of expressive rich internet applications, content, and videos across devices. Some of the features from the Flash Player Incubator, such as Stage 3D and 64-bit support, have been moved into this beta release.

Key benefits of the Flash Player 11 desktop beta include:

Stage3D APIs — Create highly interactive visuals to improve collaboration on 3-dimensional models.
64-bit support — Support for 64-bit operating systems and browsers on Linux, Mac OS, and Windows.
G.711 audio compression for telephony — Integrate voice/telephony into business apps using G.711 codec.
H.264/AVC SW Encoding — Encode higher quality video locally using H.264 video.
Socket Progress Events — Build advanced file sharing apps like FTP clients that send large amounts of data.
HD surround sound — Deliver full HD videos with 7.1 channel surround sound directly to AIR powered TVs.

More info at Adobe Labs

Adobe® AIR® 3 introduces enhanced features that provide developers a consistent and flexible development environment for the delivery of out-of-browser applications across devices and platforms.

AIR 3 delivers innovation for rich engaging applications with unparalleled performance improvements that deliver advanced graphics rendering, high-definition video, and consistent reach across operating systems and devices. AIR 3 is packed with features that will benefit all developers but has a special focus for those interested in developing console quality games, delivering high quality video, or scalable enterprise applications.

Note: The AIR 3 desktop runtime beta is provided to ensure current AIR 2.7 and AIR apps targeting older version of AIR are compatible if You want to test the new SDK You must enrole in the private prerelease program.
More info at Adobe Labs

Seems like a lot of good stuff to play with.

Happy Coding.
Dave

Robotlegs Modular + Flash CS5 Project Template for FDT 4.5


Click the image to see working example.

So here it is the updated version of my Robotlegs Modular + Flash CS5 Project Template for FDT 4.5, what it does? it will let You create a Flash CS5+Robotlegs Modular project using Robotlegs version 1.4.0 and Joel Hooks version of Stray’s Utility Modular.

Project Settings

The project is set so You can enter your own package structure e.g. “com.yourdomain.project” it will crate a folder called modules with the all the classes needed it will also create a Flash .XFL with the Views( MovieClips) already mapped to Your classes.

I also gave the design a little make over 😉 see the example above.

So where do You get this template and how to use it:

1.- Download the Project Template form GitHub extra points if You make a fork.

2.- Install the project template in Your FDT folder:
On OSX the path is: (Your User Name) > Library > Application Support > FDT
For windows: C:\Users\{Username}\AppData\Roaming\FDT

3.- Create a project with this template in Your project settings will be on Web>Robotlegs Modular + Flash CS5

4.- Compile the Project and Enjoy 😉

RobotLegs – Flash CS5 Project Template for FDT4

Projects Templates are an extremely useful tool introduced in the version 4 of PowerFlasher’s FDT it lets You write and include Your own project templates  and are available for you to use when creating a new project in: File>New>New Flash Project.

One of the frameworks that I used the most in 2010 ( expect upcoming post on the 10 frameworks that I used the most last year) is Robotlegs created by Shaun Smith a pure AS3 micro-architecture framework that  is pretty handy when You work in large projects, so the project template that I made is a pretty basic setup of Robotlegs It has a loader class and loader. fla and the MainApplication and main.fla, that fla is where all the Robotlegs magic happens it has the main context 3 views and its mediators 3 commands and an event. This template can be used as a sandbox for starting a small Flash CS5 based Robotlegs project.

How to install the project templates:

In mac open up the Finder and navigate to your home folder. After you installed FDT4 you’ll find a folder called “FDT” there. Navigate to FDT/projectTemplates/Web and copy the RobotlegsFlashCS5 folder in there and Youre good to go.

In Windows 7 go to C:\Users\User\AppData\Roaming\FDT\projectTemplates\Web copy the RobotlegsFlashCS5 folder in there and You’re all set.

Hope it helps the code is not commented I’ll try to push a commented version to  github as soon as i have the chance.

Ups almost forgot You can download the ProjectTemplate at my FDT-Resources fork in github.

Adobe Flash Media Playback

The new Adobe Flash Media Playback is a free, standard media player for the flash platform, it can be used in any site with only a few lines of HTML, enabling playback of video and other media in minutes. Its extensible plug-in architecture enables easy integration with content delivery networks. There’s a easy to use configuration page to set up the look and feel of Your Player. A thing to note it’s that this is not the Open Source version  Strobe Media Playback. so if you want to dive in to the code of the player itself that’s probably a best solution, but if you are looking for a fast way to deliver video content in your blog or site try Adobe Flash Media Playback

Features

Easy configuration
Easily configure the standard functionality of Adobe® Flash® Media Playback. Control capabilities such as autoplay, autohide controls, poster frame definition, control bar positioning, and more — without the use of Adobe Flash authoring tools.

Custom look and feel
Completely replace each of the existing elements of the standard user interface with your own custom artwork.

Streamlined standard functionality
Eliminate duplicate efforts by leveraging the logic built into Flash Media Playback. Enjoy support for standard playback functions such as play/pause/stop, rewind, fast forward, DVR, multibitrate switching, and video navigation.

Integration of latest Adobe Flash Platform features
Enable quick integration of the latest Flash Platform features such as HTTP Dynamic Streaming and DVR functionality.

High-quality, multiprotocol support
Deliver the highest quality playback experience for the given bandwidth, detect and recover from error conditions, and improve overall user experience by working with the latest features of Adobe Flash Player 10.1 and Flash Media Server 3.5 software and HTTP Dynamic Streaming.

Open source file specifications
Achieve a live streaming experience using the MP4 fragment format, the industry standard for adaptive bitrate delivery, including open file format specifications for the media and manifest formats.

Plug-ins for advertising, analytics, and content delivery networks
Enhance your media player to monetize and track your content by utilizing plug-ins for advertising, analytics, and content delivery networks. Flash Media Playback allows you to load plug-ins hosted by partners dynamically, allowing your services to be upgraded without any changes to your website.