Flash Player 11 & AIR 3 Betas at Adobe Labs

Adobe in his secret plan of not letting Me catch up with the latests runtimes 😉 has just released new beta versions of Adobe Flash Player 11 and Adobe AIR 3 and are available at Adobe Labs.

Some of the new features are:

AdobeÂŽ FlashÂŽ Player 11 desktop beta drives innovation for rich, engaging digital experiences with new features for cross-platform browser-based viewing of expressive rich internet applications, content, and videos across devices. Some of the features from the Flash Player Incubator, such as Stage 3D and 64-bit support, have been moved into this beta release.

Key benefits of the Flash Player 11 desktop beta include:

Stage3D APIs — Create highly interactive visuals to improve collaboration on 3-dimensional models.
64-bit support — Support for 64-bit operating systems and browsers on Linux, Mac OS, and Windows.
G.711 audio compression for telephony — Integrate voice/telephony into business apps using G.711 codec.
H.264/AVC SW Encoding — Encode higher quality video locally using H.264 video.
Socket Progress Events — Build advanced file sharing apps like FTP clients that send large amounts of data.
HD surround sound — Deliver full HD videos with 7.1 channel surround sound directly to AIR powered TVs.

More info at Adobe Labs

AdobeÂŽ AIRÂŽ 3 introduces enhanced features that provide developers a consistent and flexible development environment for the delivery of out-of-browser applications across devices and platforms.

AIR 3 delivers innovation for rich engaging applications with unparalleled performance improvements that deliver advanced graphics rendering, high-definition video, and consistent reach across operating systems and devices. AIR 3 is packed with features that will benefit all developers but has a special focus for those interested in developing console quality games, delivering high quality video, or scalable enterprise applications.

Note: The AIR 3 desktop runtime beta is provided to ensure current AIR 2.7 and AIR apps targeting older version of AIR are compatible if You want to test the new SDK You must enrole in the private prerelease program.
More info at Adobe Labs

Seems like a lot of good stuff to play with.

Happy Coding.
Dave

Adobe announces The Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Product Family

Today Adobe has announced a very  significative update to the Creative Suite family of products, The Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 which is also the first time Adobe does a mid-cycle release, according to Adobe this releases will help developers and designers get up to speed on technology changes the milestone releases (such as CS3, CS4, CS5) are moved to a two-year cycle , I was part of the private prerelease beta for Flash Builder 4.5 and Flash Catalyst 5.5 and let me say it comes with a lot of new and cool features. This release has a lot of mobile targeted features “Android, iOS, Blackberry” which will facilitate You targeting various devices using the same codebase there’s also great new features in Flash CS5.5 and all the HTML5 cool stuff in Dreamweaver CS5.5 including the jQuery mobile framework integration for browser-based content. So here is a list of some of the new features and be sure to check out the introduction post and  Adobe, Flash Platform, CS5 Twitter timelines.

Flash Builder 4.5

  • Android, BlackBerry and iOS development
  • Lots of new coding enhancement and productivity features
  • Improved workflow between Flash Builder and Flash Catalyst
  • Uses Eclipse version 3.6.1 “Helios”
  • Performance improvements
  • Supports code and design view of the same document
  • Introduces a new version of Flash Builder 4.5 aimed for PHP developers with Zend integration

 

Flash Catalyst 5.5

  • Resizable applications and components
  • Timeline and animation enhancements
  • Custom skinnable components
  • Improved interaction choices
  • Common library panel

 

Flash Professional 5.5

  • Workflow improvements for mobile development
  • Content scaling on stage resizing
  • Performance optimization with rasterization for symbols
  • Enhanced layer controls
  • Code snippet handling improvements and enhancements
  • Inverse kinematics pinning support
  • File auto-save and recovery
  • Incremental compilation with asset caching
  • Seamless mobile testing

Dreamweaver 5.5

  • Multiscreen preview panel
  • CSS3 and HTML5 support
  • JQuery Mobile integration
  • Native Android and iOS apps development and packaging
  • Adobe BrowserLab integration
  • FTPS, FTPeS support

 

 

Quickguide: Using AIR 2.6 in FDT 4

So finally I got some free time to write this post about using the new Adobe AIR 2.6 in your FDT 4 environment, so let’s get to it:

As you know Adobe recently released the Adobe 2.6 runtime and SDK with significant improvements including iOS support bringing feature parity for Android and iOS platforms, more info on Adobe AIR team’s blog.

Some of the new features are:

AIR for iOS

  • Updated AIR for iOS support with improved performance. Developers can take advantage of new features in iOS 4 like multitasking, Retina display for higher screen resolutions, and front and back camera support. Developers can now build application that capture audio with the microphone and take advantage of the same graphics hardware method used in AIR for Android using OpenGL ES2 for fast graphics.
  • Packager for iPhone (PFI) is now replaced with and the functionality integrated with AIR Developer Tool (ADT) a comand line tool for compiling application in the AIR SDK. ADT can now be used to package AIR files, native desktop installers, AIR applications for Android and iOS.

AIR for Android

  • Submit apps to be included in the Amazon Appstore for Android when the store launches.  Companies now have an additional distribution option with one of the largest online shopping destinations on the web.
  • USB debugging was added as an additional debugging option to WiFi.

So what do You need to start testing this new capabilities in AIR SDK 2.6, if You’re part of Adobe’s Flex SDK and Flash Builder private pre-release program You can start testing this right away. If You like to start working with the Adobe AIR 2.6 SDK inside of FDT4 the following guide should be a good start.

1.-Download the SDKs.

Download The Adobe AIR SDK 2.6 and Flex 4.1 latest stable release.

2.- Merge the SDKs

To start using the AIR 2.6 specific features You need to merge the AIR SDK with your flex sdk to do that I created a new copy of my flex SDK renamed it to “flex_sdk_4.1.0.16076_AIR_2.6” and then copy the entire contents of the AIR SDK in there it will ask You to replace files and folders  just click ok and move on to next step.

3.- Adding the SDK to FDT


Fire up Your copy of FDT then go to “Preferences->FDT->Installed SDKs “ click the Add button located in the top right of the panel this will open a new panel asking for the “Path:”  select the folder path to Your newly created SDK, mine is located in “C:\SDKs\flex_sdk_4.1.0.16076_AIR_2.6” give it a name I called mine: “Flex 4.1 AIR 2.6 SDK” hit Ok and  now You’re ready to build a project using AIR 2.6 features, on to next step.

4.- Create a project.

Create a new Flash project by going to “File->New->New Flash Project” give Your project a name, set the project type to Desktop and in the options section of the window change the Flex version to  Flex 4 AIR click the “next” button it will take You to the SDK configuration panel, select the one You created in the last step in my case it was “Flex 4.1 AIR 2.6 SDK” then click finish.

5.- Change the compiler settings.


Right click the project You just created select Properties–>FDT Compiler and change the target player from “-target-player={playerVersion}” to “-target-player={11}” this will let You compile and debug Your project without any errors. Remember to set the version of  your application to “2.6” in Your descriptor file.

 

I will make a full example on how to deploy and debug both to Android and iOS using an ANT file in another post, until then, happy coding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adobe Wallaby Prerelease 1 Example

Yesterday I posted a video of  how Adobe’s new Flash to HTML5 conversion tool “Wallaby” works. I was so excited by this new black magic stuff that I forgot to put up an example(big duhhh), so thanks to Antonio Holguin‘s comment in my previous post here’s the Wallaby generated HTML5 I showed in the video I made small modifications to the .html and .css files to add the Flash Animation so You can compare the Flash and the HTML5 versions.

Click on the image to see the example:

Here is the HTML file Wallaby generated:

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<!-- Created with Adobe(R) technology -->
 
    <script src="jquery-1.4.2.js" type="text/javascript"><!--mce:0--></script>
    <script src="index.js" type="text/javascript"><!--mce:1--></script>
    <script src="swfobject.js" type="text/javascript"><!--mce:2--></script>
	<script type="text/javascript"><!--mce:3--></script>
 
 
 
<div class="mainDiv">
 
 
<div class="myFontHTML5">
 
<a>Wallaby HTML5 Generated Animation</a>
</div>
 
 
 
<div class="wlby_movie">
 
 
<div class="wlby_1">
        <!-- Start of symbol: daveflota -->
 
 
<div class="wlby_2">
          <!-- Start of symbol: Tween 1 -->
          <img class="wlby_3" src="index_assets/svgblock_0.svg" alt="" />
 
 
<div class="wlby_4">
            <!-- Start of symbol: sombrero -->
 
 
<div class="wlby_5">
              <!-- Start of symbol: Tween 7 -->
              <img class="wlby_6" src="index_assets/svgblock_1.svg" alt="" />
              <!-- End of symbol: Tween 7 --></div>
 
            <!-- End of symbol: sombrero -->
 
</div>
 
 
 
<div class="wlby_7">
            <!-- Start of symbol: ojitosdave2 -->
 
 
<div class="wlby_8 wlby_sprite">
              <img class="wlby_17 wlby_fs" src="index_assets/svgblock_2.svg" alt="" />
              <img class="wlby_18 wlby_fs" src="index_assets/svgblock_3.svg" alt="" />
              <img class="wlby_18 wlby_fs" src="index_assets/svgblock_3.svg" alt="" />
              <img class="wlby_19 wlby_fs" src="index_assets/svgblock_3.svg" alt="" />
              <img class="wlby_20 wlby_fs" src="index_assets/svgblock_4.svg" alt="" />
              <img class="wlby_21 wlby_fs" src="index_assets/svgblock_5.svg" alt="" />
              <img class="wlby_22 wlby_fs" src="index_assets/svgblock_4.svg" alt="" />
              <img class="wlby_23" src="index_assets/svgblock_2.svg" alt="" /></div>
 
            <!-- End of symbol: ojitosdave2 -->
 
</div>
 
          <!-- End of symbol: Tween 1 -->
 
</div>
 
        <!-- End of symbol: daveflota -->
 
</div>
 
 
</div>
 
 
 
<div class="myFontFlash">
 
<a>Flash CS5 Original Animation</a>
</div>
 
 
 
<div class="myFlashContent">
 
 
<div id="flashContent">
		<a href="http://www.adobe.com/go/getflashplayer" target="_blank">
	        <img src="http://www.adobe.com/images/shared/download_buttons/get_flash_player.gif" alt="Get Adobe Flash player" />
	    </a></div>
 
 
</div>
 
 
 
<div class="animCredits">
 
 
<a>Character design and animation by:</a> <a href="http://www.cecymeade.com"> Cecy Meade</a>
 
 
</div>
 
 
</div>
 
 

And the CSS file Wallaby generated:

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div.wlby_movie
{
	overflow: hidden;
	position: absolute;
	left: 0px;
	top: 40px;
	width: 550px;
	height: 400px;
	margin-left:560px;
}
.wlby_text p { padding: 0; margin: 0; }
 
a.wlby_classic-link { color: inherit; text-decoration: none; }
a.wlby_classic-link:link { color: inherit; text-decoration: none; }
a.wlby_classic-link:hover { color: inherit; text-decoration: none; }
a.wlby_classic-link:active { color: inherit; text-decoration: none; }
a.wlby_classic-link:visited { color: inherit; text-decoration: none; }
 
a.wlby_tlf-link { color: inherit; text-decoration: none; }
a.wlby_tlf-link:link { color: inherit; text-decoration: none; }
a.wlby_tlf-link:hover { color: inherit; text-decoration: none; }
a.wlby_tlf-link:active { color: inherit; text-decoration: none; }
a.wlby_tlf-link:visited { color: inherit; text-decoration: none; }
 
.wlby_button &gt; * { visibility: hidden; }
.wlby_button &gt; .wlby_button_normal { visibility: visible; }
.wlby_button:hover &gt; .wlby_button_normal { visibility: hidden; }
.wlby_button:hover &gt; .wlby_button_hover { visibility: visible; }
.wlby_button:active &gt; .wlby_button_normal { visibility: hidden; }
.wlby_button:active &gt; .wlby_button_hover { visibility: hidden; }
.wlby_button:active &gt; .wlby_button_active { visibility: visible; }
 
@-webkit-keyframes wlby_frameset-animation {
	from { }
	to { }
}
 
.wlby_fs, .wlby_graphic 
{
	-webkit-animation-name: wlby_frameset-animation;
}
 
.wlby_graphic 
{
	-webkit-animation-duration: 1s;
}
 
.wlby_masked 
{
	height: inherit;
	position: inherit;
	width: inherit;
}
 
.wlby_sprite 
{
	-webkit-animation-name: wlby_frameset-animation;
	-webkit-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
}
 
@-webkit-keyframes wlby_KF_5 {
from {
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0);
	opacity: 1;
}
46.66% {
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, 0, -10);
	opacity: 1;
}
96.66% {
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0);
	opacity: 1;
}
96.67%, to {
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0);
}
}
@-webkit-keyframes wlby_KF_9 {
from {
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0);
	opacity: 1;
}
46.66% {
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 5);
	opacity: 1;
}
96.66% {
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0);
	opacity: 1;
}
96.67%, to {
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0);
}
}
.wlby_3
{
	position: absolute;
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, -102.635, -127.95);
}
 
.wlby_23
{
	-webkit-animation-duration: 0.0322581s;
	display: none;
	position: absolute;
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, -76.161, -31.85);
}
 
.wlby_20
{
	-webkit-animation-duration: 0.129032s;
	display: none;
	position: absolute;
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, -76.161, -31.85);
}
 
.wlby_17
{
	-webkit-animation-duration: 0.612903s;
	position: absolute;
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, -76.161, -31.85);
}
 
.wlby_22
{
	-webkit-animation-duration: 1.64516s;
	display: none;
	position: absolute;
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, -76.161, -31.85);
}
 
.wlby_19
{
	-webkit-animation-duration: 0.0322581s;
	display: none;
	position: absolute;
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, -75.875, -7.3);
}
 
.wlby_18
{
	-webkit-animation-duration: 0.16129s;
	display: none;
	position: absolute;
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, -75.875, -7.3);
}
 
.wlby_21
{
	-webkit-animation-duration: 0.290323s;
	display: none;
	position: absolute;
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, -75.875, -7.3);
}
 
.wlby_6
{
	position: absolute;
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, -29.813, -20.309);
}
 
.wlby_8
{
	-webkit-animation-duration: 3.06452s;
}
 
.wlby_2
{
	-webkit-animation-duration: 0.967742s;
	-webkit-animation-name: wlby_KF_5;
	-webkit-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
	-webkit-transform-origin: 0px 0px;
	-webkit-animation-timing-function: linear;
}
 
.wlby_5
{
	-webkit-animation-duration: 0.967742s;
	-webkit-animation-name: wlby_KF_9;
	-webkit-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
	-webkit-transform-origin: 0px 0px;
	-webkit-animation-timing-function: linear;
}
 
.wlby_1
{
	-webkit-animation-duration: 0.0322581s;
	-webkit-transform: matrix(1, 0, 0, 1, 275.45, 200.45);
	-webkit-transform-origin: 0px 0px;
}
 
.wlby_7
{
	position: absolute;
	-webkit-transform:matrix(1,0,0,1,-0.4,14.9);
}
 
.wlby_4
{
	position: absolute;
	-webkit-transform:matrix(1,0,0,1,48.65,-137.45);
}
 
div.mainDiv{
	position: relative;
	width: 1150px;
	height: 456px;
}
 
.myFontFlash {
	position: absolute;
	font-family: Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif;
	font-weight: bold;
	font-size: 16px;
	color:#066;
	margin-top:0px;
}
 
.myFontHTML5 {
	position: absolute;
	font-family: Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif;
	font-weight: bold;
	font-size: 16px;
	color:#066;
	margin-left:560px;
	margin-top:0px;
}
.myFlashContent {
	position: absolute;
	width:550px; 
	height:400px; 		 
	margin-top: 40px;	
}
.animCredits {
	position: absolute;
	font-family: Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif;
	margin-top:440px;
	font-size: 12px;
	color:#066;
}

Flash Animation to HTML5 with Adobe’s Wallaby Prerelease 1

Adobe Labs just released Wallaby (Prerelease 1) a tool that will let You convert Flash Animations to HTML5 (http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/wallaby/). Here’s a screen capture of  Wallaby converting from a Flash CS5 character(it’s supposed to be Me …. boy I’m handsome :P) animation to HTML5 the illustration and animation was done by @cecymeade for a game we are putting up together.

Adobe Labs excerpt:
“Wallaby” is the codename for an experimental technology that converts the artwork and animation contained in AdobeÂŽ FlashÂŽ Professional (FLA) files into HTML. This allows you to reuse and extend the reach of your content to devices that do not support the Flash runtimes. Once these files are converted to HTML, you can edit them with an HTML editing tool, such asAdobe DreamweaverÂŽ, or by hand if desired. You can view the output in one of the supported browsers or on an iOS device.

Flash Player Incubator “Molehill” 3D APIs for Adobe Flash Player and Adobe AIR

So this has been quite a Sunday  full of Adobe surprises and news, this morning Lee Brimelow and Thibault Imbert gave a keynote at Flash Gaming Summit and one of the big news was the announcement of the new Flash Player 11 “Molehill”  APIs is now available at Adobe Labs.

So what is “Molehill”?
Molehill is the code name for a new set of low-level, GPU-accelerated 3D APIs that will enable advanced 3D experiences across screens through the AdobeÂŽ FlashÂŽ Platform runtimes. These new low-level APIs will provide advanced 3D and 3D engine developers the flexibility to leverage GPU hardware acceleration for significant performance gains.

How to target the “Molehill” player and start building some cool 3D stuff?
First of all You’ll need to download the Adobe AIR and Adobe Flash Player Incubator from Adobe Labs page in order to see and play with “Molehill” demos like the “Zombie Tycoon” by Frima Studios:

If You want to author and target Molehill here is an excerpt from Adobe’s Authoring for Flash Player 11,0,0,58 Incubator :

Download the documentation for Flash Player 11,0,0,58 by clicking here.

Download the playerglobal.swc for Flash Player 11,0,0,58 by clicking here.

To use the new Flash Player 11,0,0,58, you will need to target SWF version 13 by passing in an extra compiler argument to the Flex compiler: -swf-version=13. Directions are below.

If you are using the Adobe Flex SDK:

  1. Download build 19786 from the Hero Stable Builds table. (Note: This is an in-development build of Flex SDK “Hero” and may contains bugs and incomplete features).
  2. Install the build in your development environment
    1. In Flash Builder, create a new ActionScript project: File -> New -> ActionScript project.
    2. Open the project Properties panel (right-click and chose ‘Properties’). Select ‘ActionScript Compiler’ from the list on the left.
    3. Use the ‘Configure Flex SDK’s’ option in the upper right hand corner to point the project to Flex build 19786. Click ok.
  3. Configure your project to target SWF version 13
    1. Open the project Properties panel (right-click and chose ‘Properties’). Select ‘ActionScript Compiler’ from the list on the left.
    2. Add to the ‘Additional compiler arguments’ input: -swf-version=13. This ensures the outputted SWF targets SWF version 13. If you compile on the command-line and not in Flash Builder, you need to add the same compiler argument.
    3. Ensure you have installed the Flash Player 11,0,0,58 Incubator nuild in your browser.

If you are using Adobe Flash Professional:

You can create your own profile to publish to a specific SWF version in Adobe Flash CS5. See this package, it contains a sample FlashPlayer11.xml file file you need to copy into the right place.

  1. FlashPlayer11.xml goes into: Adobe Flash CS5\Common\Configuration\Players
  2. Place the playerglobal.swc related to the Incubator build you are working with into: Adobe Flash CS5\Common\Configuration\ActionScript 3.0\FP11
  3. Restart Flash Professional after that and then select ’Flash Player 11’ in the publish settings. It will publish to a SWF13 file.

Important: Always remember to set wmode=direct in your HTML parameters. Software fallback will be used if you do not use wmode=direct.

Can I still use my Flash 3D Framework?

As announced in Adobe MAX 2010 all the mayor Flash 3D  frameworks (Alternativa3D, Away3d, CopperCube, Flare3D, Minko, Sophie3D or Yogurt3D.) have been working alongside with Adobe to bring support for Flash Player’s new 3D APIs being Away3D  the first one to release a “Molehill” supported version.

Away3D 4.0 Alpha (codename “Broomstick”).

Shortly after Adobe announcement Away3D’s team was released a new version(4.0 Alpha) of their framework codenamed “Broomstick” and let me say it runs great I’m really looking to have some free time to test and post about the new features in Away3D but for the time being You can check some of the examples and tests made by the team here.

To start playing with “Broomstick” You need  to download this version from their googlecode repository or their downloads page.

Adobe Flash and Unity3D


Unity3D’s team has a blog post about Flash Player plugin support here is an excerpt:

“In the past few months, our engineers have been investigating the possibility of adding a Flash Player exporting option to Unity. That investigation has gone very well, and we’re moving into full production.” read the full article here.

So this are some of the things announced at the Flash Gaming Summit if hurry up You can still catch the live stream.

Later 😀

RobotLegs – Flash CS5 Project Template for FDT4

Projects Templates are an extremely useful tool introduced in the version 4 of PowerFlasher’s FDT it lets You write and include Your own project templates  and are available for you to use when creating a new project in: File>New>New Flash Project.

One of the frameworks that I used the most in 2010 ( expect upcoming post on the 10 frameworks that I used the most last year) is Robotlegs created by Shaun Smith a pure AS3 micro-architecture framework that  is pretty handy when You work in large projects, so the project template that I made is a pretty basic setup of Robotlegs It has a loader class and loader. fla and the MainApplication and main.fla, that fla is where all the Robotlegs magic happens it has the main context 3 views and its mediators 3 commands and an event. This template can be used as a sandbox for starting a small Flash CS5 based Robotlegs project.

How to install the project templates:

In mac open up the Finder and navigate to your home folder. After you installed FDT4 you’ll find a folder called “FDT” there. Navigate to FDT/projectTemplates/Web and copy the RobotlegsFlashCS5 folder in there and Youre good to go.

In Windows 7 go to C:\Users\User\AppData\Roaming\FDT\projectTemplates\Web copy the RobotlegsFlashCS5 folder in there and You’re all set.

Hope it helps the code is not commented I’ll try to push a commented version to  github as soon as i have the chance.

Ups almost forgot You can download the ProjectTemplate at my FDT-Resources fork in github.

Matan Uberstein´s Auto Flash Class Panel

The Auto Flash Class Panel is an extension for Flash CS5  that will let You get rid of the tedious work of naming Your library items and believe Me when you working with small projects this is something that you can do by yourself without much effort but as projects get bigger and the amount of things you have to give a class name for working with them in ActionScript the task can really become tedious and cumbersome. Enter Matan Uberstein’s Auto Flash Class Panel.

The panel will let You select and give class names to your library items with a few clicks (literally), for installation You must have the Adobe Extencion Manager if you don’t have it already installed You can download it from here.  To start using the Auto Flash Class Panel you can get the version 2 here.

Once You have it installed fire up Flash and open the panel in Window>Other Panels>AutoFlashClassPanel the the panel is packed with a rich interface split into two sections (see Fig. 1), Selector and Classer. The Selector section automatically selects all the library items that match your criteria. Choose from MovieClips, Bitmaps, Sounds, Fonts or Buttons. Once you are happy with your selection of library items, you simply use the Classer section to automatically insert class, base class and tick the ‘export’ checkbox.

Fig. 1

One of the cool features is that the Class and package names are generated form your library folder structure so to get  your classes in the proper packages all you need to do is to sort your library items in those folders e.g. “com.swfgeek.robotlegs.views.MainAnimation” ( see Fig. 2).

Fig. 2

With one simple click your library is ready for export. Saves you the effort of right clicking on the library item going to properties, ticking the ‘export’ checkbox and typing in the package/class name. In the Classer section you can adjust the base class of your items( see Fig. 3)

Fig. 3

The Auto Flash Class Panel is also fully customizable, to modify how it works or add your custom base classes to the menu click the settings button and customize how you want the panel to work and function(see fig. 4).

Fig. 4

The panel was built with Robotlegs, AS3Signals, MinimalComps and FDT4. I’ve been using it  in my diary projects workflow for over a week now and it’s a really time saver, check out Matan’s post about it and be sure not to miss his upcoming presentation on Asset Loader this  17th of December.

Here’s a video by Matan on how to use the panel.

Don’t be shy and give it a try  You won’t regret it 😉

Flash Player 10.2 Beta – StageVideo CPU Performance Test (Video)

Flash Player 10.2 Beta – StageVideo CPU Performance Test from Dave Gamez on Vimeo.

This is a example of the StageVideo API performance on Windows 7 (The microphone got messy on me so there’s no audio but anyway You get to see on the monitor how the new Flash Player 10.2 performs).

If You wan’t more info on how to start making some test on Your own reading the Getting Started with stage video article on the ADC by Thibault Imbert will be a good point to start.

Adobe Flash Player 10.2 Beta – Stage Video hardware acceleration (Video).

Adobe Flash Player 10.2 Beta – Stage Video hardware acceleration. from Dave Gamez on Vimeo.

A short screencap testing the Stage Video hardware acceleration and full screen mode with multiple monitors capabilities in Adobes´s Flash Player 10.2 using Google Chrome Task Manager (CPU Monitor) on Windows 7